The Story of a Story

A couple of years ago, I wrote a short story for a charity anthology. “Light of the Moon” was about a young woman jilted at the altar when her mother (an accused murderess) Into the woods front coverescaped from jail with the sheriff (the young woman’s fiance.) The story had an open ending because I love open endings.

Not everyone loves open endings. I was asked countless times what happened to the young woman, to her mother, to the sheriff. The answer was, I didn’t know. When the story came to me, it ended with the jilting. I never seriously considered writing a sequel until Sister Jean, the facilitator at the retreat house where “Light of the Moon” was written, told me she wanted to know what happened to the sheriff. She said I should write a sequel.

I went to Catholic school. When a nun says you should do something, you do it.

The Murderess of Bayou Rosa is that sequel.

murderess cover

Set in 1920 in a small bayou town in Louisiana, it is the story of a fallen woman who crosses the line of her hometown’s tolerance when she shoots her lover in the back. After a world war and influenza pandemic, can a jury of twelve men vote to hang a woman they’ve seen grow up since birth?

The Murderess of Bayou Rosa is available for Kindle or in paperback here.

 

11 thoughts on “The Story of a Story

  1. I just finished the book. Loved it on so many levels. On a purely personal level: we lived in Baton Rouge for two years, so the mention of that city brought back memories. We also lived in Memphis for six years – more memories, especially the mention of the Peabody Hotel. I set the beginning of one of my books in their lobby. It takes places at a later time than your books, so I was able to mention the ducks.

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    1. Sandra, I was so disappointed to learn my time frame preceded the ducks! Thank you for your kind words. I have not been back to Baton Rouge in 30 years, even though I was married there. I’m sure it’s quite changed.

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