40 Days of 3 Questions – Day 9

Welcome to 40 Days of 3 Questions!

For the next few weeks, meet here every morning with a notebook or document to answer three questions about writing, about your status quo as a writer, or about the writing life. You can answer briefly and go about your day, or you can use this as a warm up exercise before your regular writing schedule. Whatever works for you, works for me.

Day 9 Questions

  1. What is the first line of your current project?
  2. What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry?
  3. What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening?

You may post answers in comments or keep your thoughts private–your choice!

And here is today’s pretty picture:

I don't even know

The only way to know what’s inside a book is to read it!

9 thoughts on “40 Days of 3 Questions – Day 9

  1. “I plopped down on the towel. Stroking through Lake Lemon’s cool water had made me forget the controversy brewing in town, at least for a while.”
    The controversy will lead to the murder. I want readers to keep reading to find out about the controversy, and more.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The first line in my book comes from my protagonist Emeline. “I don’t remember much after the cellar door slammed down on me.” Because I the beginning, the reader will have to wonder whether she is a reliable narrator and if what is happening is real or only in her mind.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. 1) What is the first line of your current project? “Fire! Fire! Fire!” screamed Rachel Rosenberg. She pointed at her twin sister. “Faith started a fire.”
    2) What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry? This book features the glass craft flameworking and can be dangerous.
    3) What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening? What happens next?

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Here’s my first line:

    The man who would be Lincoln sat at the kitchen table eating a jelly donut and making sure no crumbs landed on his starched high-collared shirt or black waistcoat.

    I hope this opening works–it’s designed to pique the reader’s interest in the characters and situation. Previously I rewrote and rewrote the first chapter of “The Shooting of the Second Lincoln,” beginning with the shooting itself. It was Ramona’s comment on another manuscript– I was starting too late–that made me begin earlier in introducing my protagonist and her relationship with her grandfather, a Lincoln impersonator.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Okay, these were harder;

    What is the first line of your current project? “I wish life was more like a movie.”

    What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry? Ther;e are things going on in the character’s life that aren’t as she wants them to be; the implication is that real events are more complicated that a movie (I hope).

    What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening? Why? What is going on that is so un-movie-like? And what does it mean for the narrator?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. 1. What is the first line of your current project?
    Only a certified nut case would take a yoga class at noon then head for a massage on a day hotter than a freshly-pulled shot of espresso.
    2. What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry?
    The line introduces the narrator and hints at another major character (the massage therapist) as well as the settings that bring the killer, victim, and protagonist together. The unusual summer heat will affect the murder investigation and all the subplots. And of course, others will think the protagonist is a nutcase, for investigating, and for the conclusions she reaches – which will be correct.
    3. What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening?
    Who is this woman, where is she, why is she doing what she says is nutty – and most importantly, where will it lead her?

    BTW, Ramona, I really appreciated yesterday’s questions, on the ways the protagonist will be tested.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What is the first line of your current project? “Wendell Armstrong carried his “World’s Best Dad” mug outside.” (It may change.)
    What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry? A male is important in the story, he’s a father and the weather is nice enough to walk outside wherever he is.
    What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening? Who is Wendell, how will his child/ren figure into the story, and why should I care.

    Like

  8. ***What is the first line of your current project?
    Tally Holt had been hoping he wouldn’t show up today.

    ***What subtext or hints about the story ahead does this line carry?
    They soon learn that Tally is the MC. See below—I kind of blended these two.

    ***What do you want the reader to consider or wonder after reading this opening?
    I introduce the main character’s name, make the reader wonder who “he” is, and also wonder why she didn’t want him to show up today. Hence, some tension right away.

    Like

  9. First line: I knowed Jimmy was no account the first day he was on the ranch.

    Hints: There’s a no-account character and a good character, with potential for good guy/bad guy conflict. The setting is a ranch.

    Consider: Is the narrator reliable in his assessment of Jimmy? Is the narrator really a good guy? What will the conflict be? Will the narrator be involved or just watch? What can be inferred from the narrator’s use of “knowed” instead of “knew”?

    Like

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